When the production leader steps into the worship leader’s shoes

This past Sunday, I lead worship at National Community Church’s Potomac Yard and Gala locations.  I was given the opportunity to do that because one of our staff worship leaders and campus pastors were sick.  As a result, I was given the opportunity to jump in a lead worship for a Sunday AM service as well as Sunday PM service and two different worship teams.

It was a great opportunity, but it was also a weird flip-flop of roles and responsibility.  I am on staff at National Community Church as the Production Coordinator and I oversee production at all six locations and I’m always the guy standing in the back of the room with the production crew.  Usually, I am only on stage when something is broken or not working!

My degree is in Music Performance from Valley Forge Christian College but about half way through my degree, I took a detour and went down a different path and started getting more and more into production.

It was a great thing for me because I was able to get perspective from the other side of the mic and better assess issues that need to be worked on or improved in the technical aspect of our services.  Also, there are things that I can tighten up with coordination of making sure technical gear is where it needs to be and is functioning properly.

It also takes the things I say to another level.  For example, as a production tech, I would ask the worship leader and worship team to trust the production crew and trust that what they were doing was for their benefit.  Now, as the worship leader behind the mic, I had to trust that my production guys were doing the right thing.  That was not a time for me to try to coach them through production, it was a time for me to firmly put my trust in them and back them on their decisions and their methods for making everything happen.  If I had decided to coach the production crew through everything while still in the worship leader role, I would have been sending a bad vibe for how a worship leader should treat the production crew.  While everyone does need to work together, there is a level of trust that needs to happen.  So, this was my time to practice what I had been preaching.

Our job every Sunday morning, whether it is on the production team or the worship team is to create beautiful music and also an atmosphere of worship.  As a worship leader, I felt like it was helpful to the production team to ask them for suggestions in what I could do differently.  Sometimes, it can be awkward for a production tech to ask the worship leader to do something different publicly because he is afraid that maybe his request isn’t important enough or isn’t a big enough deal.  Opening that door of communication on both sides is a great way to help improve both the production team as well as the worship team and the relationships between each other.

So, for you church media guys out there, I guess my point with this whole post, is practice what you preach.  Don’t say anything you can’t back up.  If you want to make the rules a certain way, then you are going to have to play by those same rules too if the tables get turned.

Potomac Yard Location:

Wow. It's Quiet Here...

Be the first to start the conversation!

Leave a Reply:

Gravatar Image

Switch to our mobile site